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Family Favorite Reads from 2018-2019

The 2018-2019 school year is in officially in the books for our part of the country and nearing the end for most everyone else. As classroom teachers helped kids collect memories for yearbooks and best of lists, we wondered what books members of our families will remember most. And be sure you’re following us on social media this summer: we’ve taken the #bookaday challenge and we’re sharing book recommendations each and every day! (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter)

5th Grade Favorites:

Best book I read during 5th grade: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
Honorable Mentions: Naruto series
Favorite Reading/Writing Memory: Finishing the Harry Potter series and writing Mr. Mayo comic book.

4th Grade Favorites:

Best book I read during 4th grade: Fish in a Tree (You can read our review of Fish in a Tree here)
Honorable Mentions: Wishtree, Wish, James Patterson’s Middle School series
Favorite Reading/Writing Memory: Researching and writing about Knute Rockne for a huge school project that spanned 3 months, writing an essay about soccer cleats

3rd Grade Favorites:

Best book I read during 3rd grade: The One and Only Ivan
Honorable Mentions: How to Steal a Dog, Wish, Finding Winnie
Favorite Reading/Writing Memory: Listening to my teacher read The One and Only Ivan, writing a story called Lost.

1st Grade Favorites:

Best book I read during 1st grade: Dog Man
Honorable Mentions: Magic Tree House, Narwhal: Unicorn of the Sea, Bad Kitty
Favorite Reading/Writing Memory: Bringing home my first chapter book once I had progressed through all the easy reader levels.

Parent Favorites:

Renee: Mom, Teacher/Librarian:


Best YA (Young Adult) book I read: Long Way Down
Best MG (Middle Grade) book I read: The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise
Best picture book I read: The Remember Balloons
Favorite Reading/Writing Memory: 1) Watching my students meet and interact with Troy Cummings, author of many books, including The Notebook of Doom series. 2) Witnessing my son finish the Harry Potter series.

Nicole: Mom, Writer/Preschool Teacher:

Best YA (Young Adult) book I read: The Hate U Give (You can read our review of The Hate U Give here)
Best MG (Middle Grade) book I read: Wishtree
Best picture book I read: Dear Girl, and Groundhug Day
Favorite Reading/Writing Memory: All the comments (in person, via email or social media) from Raising Real Readers followers saying their kids loved a book we recommended or that they tried some of our tips and it worked well. Also, my youngest reading chapter books and the fulfillment of all those “as you get better, the books get better, too” promises I had made him.

Does your family like to do best of lists and rankings? Why not incorporate that into your summer reading fun? Start a list (dry erase board? Google doc?) and end summer with a special unveiling of your top choices!

If You Liked This Post, You Might Also Enjoy:
Our book recommendation list
Where To Get Book Recommendations Your Child Will Love

Disclosure: This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

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